Gazetteer

This list will develop into a list of the sanctuaries in London in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries, and the places – inns, streets and alleys – within them.

Note that some of the inns and taverns will probably be duplicates, in that they change name over time, and that some may be nicknames.

Baldwin’s Gardens. One of the ‘pretended privileged places’ named and abolished in the 1697 act.

Bulls Head and Plough. Black Horse Alley. In the Mint. Venue for Fleet marriages. Source: Brown, p.143.

Bull Tavern. Bird Cage Alley

Clink. Prison in the liberty of the Clink, Southwark. The liberty was also one of the ‘pretended privileged places’ named and abolished in the 1697 act, which claimed it was also known as ‘Deadman’s Place.’

Coach and Horses. Blackamor Street, Southwark. Fleet marriage venue, under the ministrations of a Mr Bubb. Source: Brown, p.141.

Coach and Horse Shoe. “In the Borough.” Fleet marriage venue. Source: Brown, p.141.

Coles’, Mr. Brandyleg Walk, Southwark. Fleet marriage venue. Source: Brown, p.141.

Compasses. “In an al[l]ey over against the King’s Bench.” Southwark. Fleet marriage venue. Source: Brown, p.141.

Cupid’s Gardens. Southwark. Also known as Cuper’s Gardens, a pleasure garden on the edge of St George’s Fields. It was, according to the author of the ‘True Description of The Mint’ (1710), the northwestern point of the territories of the Mint. Wikipedia: Cuper’s Gardens. London Encyclopaedia: Cuper’s Gardens.

Deadman’s Place. Southwark. Another name for the Liberty of the Clink. Listed in the act against privileged places, 1697. Now Park Street.

Dog and Duck. Southwark. Tavern at the westernmost point of the territories claimed by the Minters. Scene of a bailiff ducking reported in Applebee’s Original Weekly Journal, Saturday, June 3, 1721. Wikipedia: Dog and Duck

Farthing Fields. Wapping. One of the locales of the ‘New Minters’ after the dissolution of Southwark Mint.

Fleet Prison.

Fuller’s Rents. One of the ‘pretended privileged places’ named and abolished in the 1697 act.

Goat and Crown. Venue for ‘Fleet marriages’ in 1725, towards the south-eastern corner of the Mint,  “five doors within Mint Gate, near St. George’s Church.” Source: J.S. Burn, The Fleet Registers.

Green Bank. Wapping. Another of the locales of the ‘New Minters’ after the dissolution of Southwark Mint.

Half Moon. Tavern. In the Mint. Venue for Fleet marriages. Source: Brown, p.143.

Halifax’s, Mr. in Mint Street at the sign of Tumble Down Dick. Venue for Fleet marriages. Source: Brown, p.143.

Harrow and Lamb. In the Mint. Venue for Fleet marriages, and had its own ‘chapel.’ Source: Brown, p.143.

Johnson’s, Mr. Blue Bell Alley. In the Mint. Venue for Fleet marriages. Source: Brown, p.143.

King’s Bench Prison. Also known, during the reigns of Ann and Victoria, as Queen’s Bench prison, and during the Commonwealth, as the Upper Bench.

Marshalsea. Debtors’ prison in Southwark.

Mint Coffee House. Probably fictional, it is one of the elements in the South Sea Bubble satire The Bubbler’s Medley.

Mint Gate.

Mitre Court. One of the ‘pretended privileged places’ named and abolished in the 1697 act.

Montague Close. One of the ‘pretended privileged places’ named and abolished in the 1697 act. Said act claims it was also known as the Minories. In the vicinity of St Saviours church (now Southwark Cathedral).

Orange and Crown. In Whitefriars, December 1694. Mentioned in the deposition of Elizabeth Seymour concerning the theft of a silver tankard, fenced by a woman lodging there. London Lives.

Peels Yard.

Prince Eugene. In the Mint, 1715. Nahum Tate’s entry in the burial register of St. George’s Church gives his place of demise as “next to Prince Eugene the Mint.” Notes & Queries 1879.

Proudham’s, Mr. Brandy shop in the Mint. Venue for Fleet marriages. Source: Brown, p.143.

Queen’s Bench. Alternate name for King’s Bench during reigns of Queens Anne and Victoria.

Ram Alley. One of the ‘pretended privileged places’ named and abolished in the 1697 act.

Red Lion. “By the Mint.” Where the great pudding was boiled for fourteen days.

Royal Oak. Lombard Street. In the Mint. Venue for Fleet marriages. Source: Brown, p.143.

Rudkin’s. Coffee house close to the King’s Bench prison.

Salisbury Court. One of the ‘pretended privileged places’ named and abolished in the 1697 act. Just west of Whitefriars.

Savoy. One of the ‘pretended privileged places’ named and abolished in the 1697 act.

Southwark Cold Bath. “Is situate [sic] in Queen Street, in the Mint, Southwark. It was first opened in the Year 1705, kept by one Mr Adamson, apothecary. The rates are 2s. with the chair, and 18d. without it. Hours from 5 in the morning to 11, or the whole Year 30s. paid down; utmost time to be in, 3 Minutes. Here are 11 crutches, which they say, were those of persons cured by this Water.” Source: A New Vision of London, 1708.

Southwark Mint. Longest lasting of the post-restoration debtors’ sanctuaries, finally abolished in 1623.

Star, the. Coffee house in the Mint. Source: Ashton, Social Life in the Reign of Queen Anne.

Swan. Mint Street. Back room of the house next door a venue for Fleet marriages. Source: Brown, p.142.

Tayler’s. Coffee house in the Mint. Source: Ashton, Social Life in the Reign of Queen Anne.

Two Brewers. In Mint Street, according to the credits on the 1721 print ‘Great Britain’s Wealth and Safety‘, a satire upon the South Sea Company. Possibly an invention to disguise the picture’s true origin, although Strype mentions a Two Brewers Yard in the vicinity.

Two Naked Boys. Venue in the Mint for bankruptcy hearings. Source: London Gazette no 4278.

Two Necked Swan. Shaw’s Court, Southwark. Fleet marriage venue. Source: Brown, p.142.

Tumble Down Dick. Mint Street. Venue for Fleet marriages. Source: Brown, p.143. And meeting place for the ‘Club of Broken Shopkeepers’, according to Ned Ward.

Two Fighting Cocks. Kent Street. Tavern near (or in?) Southwark Mint. Venue for ‘Fleet marriages’ and bankruptcy hearings. Source: Brown, p.142.

Wapping Mint. Last of the London sanctuaries, set up by fugitives from Southwark Mint in 1723 or 1724, and put down by 1725.

Whitefriars. The most notorious of the ‘pretended privileged places’ named and abolished in the 1697 act.

White House. “A messuage …. with the appurtenances comonly knowne by the name of the white house in the Mint in Southwark.” Mentioned in the Inventory of Paul Docminique senior, 1680/1, transcribed at Marine Lives.

Sources:

Ashton, John, Social Life in the Reign of Queen Anne, London, 1904.
Brown, Roger L., The Fleet Marriages, Welshpool, 2007.

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